Micron-spot Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy

Micron-spot Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy
3D image from combined confocal height measurement and EDXRF measurement taken on a target interface within a wafer packaging bump. Colors are keyed to different height ranges, and model maps the height of a single element across the interface

Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy (EDXRF) is a fast, nondestructive spectroscopy technique used to determine the elemental composition of a near-surface volume, and to compute thin film thickness in a multilayer stack.

Strengths
  • Rapid data collection across total energy spectrum
  • Micron-scale beam spot combined with 4 EDX detectors enable fast, high-resolution elemental mapping
  • Parallel 2D and 3D confocal microscopy are possible on the Onyx instrument
  • Minimal sample preparation
  • 0.5um x/y stage resolution, 50nm stage height resolution
Limitations
  • No direct bonding state, oxidation, or molecular information
  • Some elemental combinations cause overlapping peaks which can hamper the evaluation
  • Elements lighter than carbon cannot be detected or quantified reliably
Base Prices
Technique Variants
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Micron-spot Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy (Micro-EDXRF)
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Example Outputs
<p>3D image from combined confocal height measurement and EDXRF measurement taken on a target interface within a wafer packaging bump. Colors are keyed to different height ranges, and model maps the height of a single element across the interface</p>
<h6>From: Rigaku</h6>

3D image from combined confocal height measurement and EDXRF measurement taken on a target interface within a wafer packaging bump. Colors are keyed to different height ranges, and model maps the height of a single element across the interface

From: Rigaku
<p>Bump height (critical dimension) measurement overlaid on 2D microscope image, showing average bump height of 147.3 microns with height range spanning 7.8 microns</p>
<h6>From: Rigaku</h6>

Bump height (critical dimension) measurement overlaid on 2D microscope image, showing average bump height of 147.3 microns with height range spanning 7.8 microns

From: Rigaku
<p>Sample EDXRF spectrum used to quantify elemental composition, collected on wafer packaging bumps with high intensities of Sn and Pb</p>

Sample EDXRF spectrum used to quantify elemental composition, collected on wafer packaging bumps with high intensities of Sn and Pb

Sample Requirements
  • Solid phase
  • Maximum Lateral Dimension: 300 mm
  • Maximum Vertical Height: 10 mm
  • Flat surface required to achieve best data quality
Instruments Used for Micro-EDXRF
Rigaku ONYX 3000

Rigaku ONYX 3000

  • Micron-scale X-ray beam spot (10s of microns in diameter)
  • Element Range: Beryllium (Be) through Uranium (U)
  • 3D Confocal Vertical Resolution: 50 nm
  • 3D Confocal Lateral Resolution: < 1 µm
  • Atmospheric pressure conditions

View Instrument Specifications

How Micro-EDXRF Works

An X-Ray beam is focused on the sample and used to excite fluorescence within the outermost 200-500 um of the material. Fluorescent signal photons are produced when electrons in the sample atoms excite to a higher energy level, then relax to their original states. As a result, the fluoresced photons have characteristic energies associated with the species of their parent atom.

The EDXRF detector resolves the incoming photons by their energy to yield a final spectrum of peaks associated with the elements in the specimen, whose intensities are correlated to the concentration of each element and its depth in the sample.

Uniquely available at Covalent is one of the first EDXRF systems ever to incorporate a micron-scale beam spot (on the order of 10s of microns), allowing it to achieve unprecedented spatial resolution!

In addition, the system incorporates quad-EDX (Energy Dispersive X-ray) detectors, increasing sensitivity and reducing measurement time. This system has an analytical chamber operable above vacuum pressures, and furthermore integrates an integrated 2D optical microscope with limit pixel size of 0.11 um, and a chromatic dispersion height sensor to allow true correlative analyses and hybrid sensor workflows.

Together, the unique combination of detectors enables precise calibration of the area to be measured and high speed data collection. These in turn facilitate high-resolution element mapping and line-scan applications, as well as pattern recognition for accelerated high-throughput analysis.

Additional Resources

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